Five Questions With Interior Designer Barbara Portnoy

Five Questions With Interior Designer Barbara Portnoy

Milkster Is A Maker-Friendly Launchpad For Interior Design Enthusiasts

Portnoy reflected on her business with The Baltimore Sun. You started art school planning to be a sculptor. What drew you to interior design? At the end of my freshman year at Pratt Institute, my parents told me to pick a major that sounded like the description of a paying job if I wanted them to send in the next semester’s tuition. My mom actually was a sculptor, and knew how difficult it would be to earn a living in that field. Looking for something that involved three-dimensional design, I declared myself a product designer because, lacking the appropriate information, I didn’t consider interior design a serious enough career.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://articles.baltimoresun.com/2014-03-28/business/bs-bz-plda-5-questions-20140328_1_interior-design-five-questions-paul-street

Kassin Laverty’s Interior Design Fair signature

Once you start moving the puzzle pieces around, it’s easier to get a sense for your needs and what you really need to shop for. Otherwise, you can end up buying a lot of stuff you don’t need, trying to Band-Aid the problem, when in fact all you might need is a little spring cleaning!” Child’s play: “When is the last time you used markers, crayons or paint? We recognize the importance of creative expression for children, but once we grow up, often tactile experiences fall away. Sure, computers are great, but the experiences of things like paint, Play-Doh, collaging and simply drawing – who cares what it looks like? – can reinvigorate your brain in myriad ways and help you view a design project in an entirely new light.” A few favorites Inside: “Clients often ask us for a modern look, but don’t want it to feel too cold. Inside is a great Hayes Valley furniture store whose pieces are fully customizable and available in store for a test drive. We upholstered these eggplant swivel chairs and creamy sectional with custom fabric, adjusted the seat heights and depths to fit our client, and built a zebra-wood console into the sectional back.” ( www.insidemodern.com ) Stikwood: “Stikwood is modern-day veneer, a thin wood material that can easily be applied to walls and ceilings to create warmth and dimension.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.sfgate.com/homeandgarden/stylemakerspotlight/article/Kassin-Laverty-s-Interior-Design-Fair-signature-5355429.php

It adds value to your home, Matteis said. Yet, designers dont have a lot of connections. It would be really hard to get this sort of iPhone of the chair out that is unless the designer compromises and works with a big brand that can buy his or her design. But it would be a very different product. We enable them to launch to a broader audience without having to make a compromise. Most products are released as first editions. It means that these products are not available anywhere else and are made to order. And because you are funding the first batch, you are supporting the designer.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://techcrunch.com/2014/04/01/milkster-is-a-maker-friendly-launchpad-for-interior-design-enthusiasts/